writers

Dramatis Personae

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Many novels, particularly the lengthier multi-volumes in the fantasy field, are packed with characters, some major, some minor, others appearing so intermittently that they can be easily forgotten. Many readers will remember a full cast list with no problem; they simply go with the flow and, especially with a well-written story that has an engaging narrative, hardly ever need to check the list of characters, or dramatis personae. Nevertheless, having something that can be referred to when you’re unsure just who is who can be invaluable. Think Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones and you can see what I mean. Or you may be reading mainstream or crime or any other genre: the arguments for the dramatis personae may still apply.

Read more in our Tips and Advice section on how the dramatis personae may help the writer.

 

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How to get published

WRITE TIME: HOW TO GET PUBLISHED WITH RENEGADE WRITERS.

FRIDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2016. 3.00 pm-5.00 pm

As part of the Live Age Festival, there is  a panel and Q & A session with local writers and publishers who have first hand experience of the pressures of publication. If you need help navigating the complicated world of book publishers, come and ask the people who know! 

THIS IS A FREE EVENT BUT PLEASE BOOK.

Venue: Mitchell Arts Centre, Broad St, Hanley, Stoke (1st Floor Meeting Room)

FURTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND HERE

 

 

Walking & Meditation

Penkhull author Jan Edwards considers meditation:

When walking to the High Street I sometimes (health allowing) make a slight detour through the church yard. It is a beautifully peaceful place whatever the season. It is a place where I often indulge in a walking meditation, and is frequently a place where plotting problems in writing can become clear – and/or inspire new work.

A few days ago I took my camera to capture its beauty – set as it is in the depths of the moorlands. It was a second shot of the church from the hillside cemetery that reminded me of a book title…

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The Two Towers!

The second spire (left hand) is the famous Pugin Church, rising from beyond the CofE Parish Church. Both are named St Giles – go figure!  Is it me or does the Pugin spire always reminds other folks of a Vorlon spaceship?

Pop over to her blog to read the full essay and check out the photos.

 

Why Do I Write?

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Penkhull author Misha Herwin asks “Why do I write?”

I’ve talked about my book at “Hot Air” the literary festival in Stoke-on-Trent, where I live: set up a Facebook page: sent out a pre-publication news-letter: searched the internet for bloggers who review women’s fiction: given out review copies: talked to everyone and anyone I’ve met and have just invited friends and neighbours to the first of a number of celebratory tea/mini launch at my house at the end of July. (There will be more such events, living room is too small to have everyone at the same time.) There will be coffee, cake and wine, hopefully followed by a few book sales.

Much as I enjoy all this, there are also the moments of panic familiar to all the writers I know about whether their book is good enough to see the light of day, let alone be read by the thousands/millions of readers we are hoping for.

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Something Remains

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Penkhull’s Peter Coleborn blogs about the forthcoming Alchemy Press book, Something Remains, which he co-edited with Pauline E Dungate:

At the 2013 World Fantasy Convention, held in Brighton, Joel Lane’s Where Furnaces Burn won the World Fantasy Award for Best Collection. Due to personal problems Joel wasn’t able to collect the award in person. I had intended to visit Joel soon after, meet up for one of our irregular balti meals with mutual friends Dave Sutton, James Brogden, John Howard, Mike Chinn and Stan Nicholls, and to toast Joel for the win. Sadly, that visit to Birmingham didn’t materialise in time – for not long after the convention Joel passed away in his sleep. His death left a huge cavity in my life.

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Bristol Beauty

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Penkhull author Jem Shaw writes:

“I’ve just completed the second of The Larks aircraft. This time it’s the Bristol Scout that Colin Hingley takes over, much to the envy of Andy Palmer, who gets sentenced to the BE2c ‘bloater’ following his less than impressive first squadron flight.

This Scout caused me some grief when writing the book. I have a signed Ivan Berryman print of Lanoe Hawker’s encounter with three Albatros and I’ve always been fascinated by its gun arrangement. The idea of trying to chase an enemy aircraft and then kick your own machine sideways to point the gun in the right direction gave rise to a sequence of which I was particularly proud. Which just served me right when I found out that the mounting had been changed by 1916 and the upper-wing mounting allowed the gun to fire more or less in the same direction as the aircraft happened to be flying. Still, the waste paper basket seemed to enjoy it.

I found David Bremner’s website while researching this illustration. He’s rebuilt the Bristol Scout flown by his grandfather in the Great War, basing his reconstruction on parts found in his ancestor’s effects. It’s an incredibly engaging account and I can heartily recommend a visit. You’ll find his site on bristolscout.wordpress.com.