Penkhull Press

Chester Literary festival

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Penkhull Press author Jan Edwards will be reading from her WW2 crime novel, Winter Downs, at this year’s Chester Literary Festival — at 11.00 am on Tuesday 27 November. More details here and here

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City of Secrets now available

City of Secrets by Misha Herwin is now available in print and eBook formats from (most) online booksellers.

Letty Parker lives by her wits. Estranged from her family, she sells pies on the streets of Bristol. But this is a Bristol full of dark secrets, peopled by gangs, monsters, dragons and gargoyles – and by creatures older than time. When her friend and stepsister disappear, when members of Jeb’s gang vanish, Letty is plunged headlong into a conspiracy where homeless children are being spirited away to a place where a terrible fate awaits them. These are the poor and the lost children of the streets whom no one seems to care about – except for Letty. But what if a rich child went missing? Would the authorities then act? Together, Letty and Jeb hatch a plan…

Fables and Fabrications reviewed

There is a new review, by Andrew Darlington, of Fables and Fabrications, see here for the full essay.

Fables and Fabrications, by Jan Edwards, is described as:

You’ll be drawn to this book – in her words, like a hungry she-bear scenting tethered sheep. Announced as ‘fourteen tales of mystery, mirth and the macabre’ this is not the grind-core slasher-horror of gut-wrenching torture-porn, more the luring strangeness of some lost golden age.

The book is available in print and Kindle versions via Amazon.

 

Winter Downs is a winner

We at Penkhull Press are delighted to report that Winter Downs by Jan Edwards (and published by our good selves) has won the 2018 Arnold Bennett Book Prize, announced over the weekend just past.

In the January of 1940 a small rural community on the Sussex Downs, already preparing for invasion from across the Channel, finds itself deep in the grip of a snowy landscape, with an ice-cold killer on the loose.

Bunch Courtney stumbles upon the body of Jonathan Frampton in a woodland clearing. Is this a case of suicide, or is it murder? Bunch is determined to discover the truth but can she persuade the dour Chief Inspector Wright to take her seriously?

Winter Downs is first in the Bunch Courtney Investigates series. Winter Downs is available from Amazon in print and eBook formats.

 

Picking Up the Pieces: book review

Picking Up the Pieces by Misha Herwin has received an excellent review on the Chat About Books website:

 This is a lovely story of friendship which I am sure many readers will relate to. With very real characters, who I easily warmed to, I soon found myself immersed in their story, almost as if I was a fourth friend sharing their troubles with them and cheering them on as they moved on to happier times and a successful future ahead of them.

Read the full review here.

 

New Title: Winter Downs by Jan Edwards

Book launch!

We are delighted to announce the launch of  Winter Downs by Jan Edwards!

3rd June 2017

ISBN 978-0-9930008-6-7 / paperback £7.99 tbc  | ebook £2.99 tbc

The Winter Downs launch party will be held in the Tolkien Room at the City Central Library, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent on 3rd June at 11.30 am with plenty of  1940’s styled fun – tea & cakes and of course a reading and Q&A session from Jan herself as well as some guest readings (tba).

Be there to get your signed copy of Winter Downs!

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In the January of 1940 a small rural community on the Sussex Downs, already preparing for invasion from across the Channel, finds itself deep in the grip of a snowy landscape, with an ice-cold killer on the loose.

Bunch Courtney stumbles upon the body of Jonathan Frampton in a woodland clearing. Is this a case of suicide, or is it murder? Bunch is determined to discover the truth but can she persuade the dour Chief Inspector Wright to take her seriously?

Winter Downs is first in the Bunch Courtney Investigates series.

Published in paper and e formats.

 

 

Changing History by Jem Shaw

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I was reminded the other day of an axiom that applies to research for writing: We don’t know what we don’t know. It’s a constant problem, especially when you’re writing a period piece. We have to check constantly that we’re not building in anachronisms that will jar the reader out of the illusion.

But how deep do you go? How do you know when to stop? It’s easy to think you’ve verified a fact but, with the best will in the world, you weren’t there at the time. And the unchecked error is always there, waiting, like a rake in the grass.

Misha Herwin, my fellow Penkhull author and great friend, was kindly editing my upcoming short story collection when she questioned a reference to ballet at Sadler’s Wells in 1914. I confidently pointed out that the theatre was opened in the 17th century by Richard Sadler.

“Ah, but were they doing ballet then?”

No, they weren’t. More thorough investigation revealed that ballet didn’t come to the Wells until long after WW1.

The lesson, apart from learning an unsuspected dislike of Misha, was that we don’t know what we don’t know, and we have to deepen our research to find and fill the gaps.

And, especially, once you’ve written a story, don’t show it to anyone.

There’s more about this sad event on my blog here.

 

How to get published

WRITE TIME: HOW TO GET PUBLISHED WITH RENEGADE WRITERS.

FRIDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2016. 3.00 pm-5.00 pm

As part of the Live Age Festival, there is  a panel and Q & A session with local writers and publishers who have first hand experience of the pressures of publication. If you need help navigating the complicated world of book publishers, come and ask the people who know! 

THIS IS A FREE EVENT BUT PLEASE BOOK.

Venue: Mitchell Arts Centre, Broad St, Hanley, Stoke (1st Floor Meeting Room)

FURTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND HERE

 

 

Why Do I Write?

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Penkhull author Misha Herwin asks “Why do I write?”

I’ve talked about my book at “Hot Air” the literary festival in Stoke-on-Trent, where I live: set up a Facebook page: sent out a pre-publication news-letter: searched the internet for bloggers who review women’s fiction: given out review copies: talked to everyone and anyone I’ve met and have just invited friends and neighbours to the first of a number of celebratory tea/mini launch at my house at the end of July. (There will be more such events, living room is too small to have everyone at the same time.) There will be coffee, cake and wine, hopefully followed by a few book sales.

Much as I enjoy all this, there are also the moments of panic familiar to all the writers I know about whether their book is good enough to see the light of day, let alone be read by the thousands/millions of readers we are hoping for.

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