Six Day Eventing by Jan Edwards

The cliched image of a starving author is of a shy and tortured creature huddled in a freezing garret dressed in tattered, dusty overcoat and fingerless gloves, scribbling furiously with a tattered quill pen by guttering candle light…

Well… okay. Maybe we aren’t starving, though when you consider how advances have vanished in recent years it’s a fair bet most of us can’t afford to be without a day job; and maybe that overcoat is a favourite ancient woolly jumper; and maybe its not so much tattered as well-washed and the garret is your centrally heated back bedroom…  But the general theory is sound – isn’t it?

Writing is acknowledged to be a lonely occupation even by the most gregarious among us.  A great many of the writers of my acquaintance are shy flowers, at least when it comes to presenting their babies to the general public for inspection. It is a hard thing to proffer the words that you have sweated buckets to produce. (more…)

SO, WHY THE CAT?

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So, Why the Cat? by Jan Edwards

One of the most frequently asked questions from people who first see my Fables and Fabrications collection is ‘why the cat?’ Title and covers are frequently  the hardest part of writing, or in the case of Fables and Fabrications  compiling a book. It could be seen as something of a chicken and egg process.  Is the cover suggested by the title? Or does the cover dictate the title?

With a collection such as Fables and Fabrications that process was made harder because the stories contained within are so diverse within that broad spectrum that is Fantasy. It is not a book of horror (though many of the stories are admittedly dark). It is not a book of fairy tales,  fantasy,  steam punk, myths or science fiction, though all are touched upon in various forms. (more…)

Dramatis Personae

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Many novels, particularly the lengthier multi-volumes in the fantasy field, are packed with characters, some major, some minor, others appearing so intermittently that they can be easily forgotten. Many readers will remember a full cast list with no problem; they simply go with the flow and, especially with a well-written story that has an engaging narrative, hardly ever need to check the list of characters, or dramatis personae. Nevertheless, having something that can be referred to when you’re unsure just who is who can be invaluable. Think Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones and you can see what I mean. Or you may be reading mainstream or crime or any other genre: the arguments for the dramatis personae may still apply.

Read more in our Tips and Advice section on how the dramatis personae may help the writer.

 

Water Spaniels?

Penkhull Press author frequently includes dogs in her fiction. Here, she writes about a particular breed — Water Spaniels.

“For those of you that don’t know, an Irish Water Spaniel is quite a rare creature. It looks a little like a poodle, with a brown curly coat. Unlike poodles, however, they have a bare chest and a thin whip like tail, which they wag with great enthusiasm. It is best not be anywhere near striking rage of these because they can really hurt. They also have a silky fringe which covers their eyes. Eyes which can be as melting as chocolate, or as evil as a large puddle of stinking mud.”

Misha Herwin

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Yesterday I was at a dog show. It was an open show for Irish Water Spaniels and it set me thinking about the breed and the part these dogs play in  my books.

For those of you that don’t know, an Irish Water Spaniel is quite a rare creature. It looks a little like a poodle, with a brown curly coat. Unlike poodles, however, they have a bare chest and a thin whip like tail, which they wag with great enthusiasm. It is best not be anywhere near striking rage of these because they can really hurt. They also have a silky fringe which covers their eyes. Eyes which can be as melting as chocolate, or as evil as a large puddle of stinking mud.

Even the most loving and devoted of owners admit that these dogs have “character” which is, in the dog world, an euphemism for being bloody…

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Casting Stories Adrift

One of the oddest things about writing fiction, be that novels or short fiction, is that you never know where it will end  up, or how it might return to you – if ever. With that in mind, I was very surprised when I was contacted this week by The Valkenswaard  War Cemetery, asking about my uncle who is buried there. I never knew him, of course, because Pvt Alfred Gedded Graham 2nd Bn. Middlesex Reg. was killed during operation ‘Market Garden’ (?) in October 1944 – some 10 years before I was born – and was buried in this tiny war cemetery…

 

To read more of Jan Edwards’ intriguing story pop over to her blog.

Jan is the author of two Penkhull Press books: Sussex Tales and Fables & Fabrications. Click on the titles to learn more.

 

How to get published

WRITE TIME: HOW TO GET PUBLISHED WITH RENEGADE WRITERS.

FRIDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2016. 3.00 pm-5.00 pm

As part of the Live Age Festival, there is  a panel and Q & A session with local writers and publishers who have first hand experience of the pressures of publication. If you need help navigating the complicated world of book publishers, come and ask the people who know! 

THIS IS A FREE EVENT BUT PLEASE BOOK.

Venue: Mitchell Arts Centre, Broad St, Hanley, Stoke (1st Floor Meeting Room)

FURTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND HERE